Photo Gallery: From Ballet Students to Stars

See the next generation of professional dancers, including newly hired company members Christian García Campos and Tommie Kesten, on stage this month in PBT School’s Pre-professional Showcases and Spring Performance 2018.

Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre School’s Pre-professional Division is a training ground for the next generation of aspiring dancers. According to Artistic Director Terrence S. Orr, “The Pre-professional Division is where dancers begin making the transition from student to professional. At this stage, dancers are honing their performance skills, cultivating their individuality as artists and testing their technique in company repertoire.” PBT’s company roster is a testament to this — Orr has recruited more than half of its dancers from the Pre-professional Division. Here, get an exclusive look at our stars while they were still students:

 

#FacesOfBalletPgh: Adon Quinerly

Adon-Quinerly performing in Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre School's Spring Performance at the Byham Theater.

Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre School student dancer; recipient of PBT’s Community Youth Scholarship

Adon Quinerly, a scholarship student at Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre SchoolAdon Quinerly was six years old when he auditioned for the inaugural class of Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre’s Community Youth Scholarship program. In his own words, “I thought it would be fun; I thought PBT would be a cool place to experience.” Now, at age 10, nearly four years into the training program, dance still makes Adon feel “happy.” He says his favorite part is “learning new dance moves” and picking up new choreography. Since joining PBT School’s Children’s Division, Adon has performed in the company’s main-stage production of The Nutcracker at the Benedum Center in addition to PBT School spring performances at the Byham Theater. Here’s why Adon’s pursuit of dance makes his mom, Maximillion Elliott-Quinerly, happy too.

Why do you think ballet is a good opportunity for Adon? Why did you decide to help him pursue or discover it?

“Dance was such a large part of my life during my pregnancy with Adon and directly after. I took him with me wherever I’d dance. When he was a baby, at times I would wear him when I taught or during congregational dances. I would grab a piece of cloth and wrap it around him and wrap him onto me.  As Adon grew, I began to incorporate him into the choreography whenever I could. Dance was very natural for him, as it was for me. Unfortunately for me, as a young person I did not have an opportunity to receive technical training. When I heard about PBT’s scholarship program, I wasn’t sure that Adon would want to pursue ballet in the way that he does.  However, I knew I had to at least put him in a position to have that option.  I wanted Adon to be able to explore his full potential in dance and not be limited by a limited dance vocabulary.  When he was awarded a scholarship with PBT, we were both very excited.  

Ballet is a beautiful language of discipline and grace, a foundational language from which one can build a dance vocabulary. I believe technical training offers the natural dancer an opportunity to expand their abilities and perfect their natural gift. Adon is developing beautifully under the guidance of PBT, and I am looking forward to watching his continued growth as a dancer and as a man.”

Why do you think these classes are an important part of his weekly routine and his life?

“The weekly routine is helping Adon to learn time management and prioritization of tasks. The discipline he is learning in ballet is transferrable to other areas of his life.”

Adon-Quinerly-performing-in-Pittsburgh-Ballet-Theatre's-The-Nutcracker
Adon Quinerly performing in Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre’s The Nutcracker

What do you think ballet brings out in Adon?

“Confidence.  Ballet is building Adon’s confidence and self-esteem; this is translating ballet into every area of his life.  Additionally, when he is at PBT and/or participating in PBT activities and performances there is a sense of community. He is a part of something that he loves and a part of a group of people who he is developing long-term relationships with.”

Why do you believe dance in general, and ballet in particular, is universal?

“I’ve spent almost a decade using dance as a platform to communicate with and bring together multi-cultural, multi-generational people from extremely diverse backgrounds. The language of dance transcends geographical, socio-economic, political and other boundaries; it draws people together to create beauty in community. Ballet in particular is a technical language that appears consistent cross-culturally. The issue is the foundational language is not known to all. This language, ballet, should be as accessible as one’s first language. However, even in the absence of audible cues, there is a kinesthetic teaching that takes place in dance. This way of teaching is invaluable particularly when one travels to teach.”

We’re celebrating diverse, inspiring dance stories all month long. Join the dialogue and follow the series at #FacesOfBalletPgh.