5 Facts to Love About ‘Romeo and Juliet’

Romeo and Juliet Pittsburgh - Ballet Photo

We could count many ways we love Romeo and Juliet, but allow us to wax poetic about just five facts, which make it the perfect season finale. This production dials up the drama with a sweeping staging that is completely new to Pittsburgh, to the United States, and to North America! Together with the PBT Orchestra, we’ll debut Derek Deane’s epic staging of Shakespeare’s story of star-crossed lovers from April 21-23, at the Benedum Center. His reading reverberates with powerful acting and emotion, creating vivid poetry without speaking one word. Here are just 5 facts about Romeo and Juliet that make it love at first sight:

1.  It’s a feast for the eyes.

The curtain rises on a gorgeous scene straight out of Renaissance-era Italy. Derek Deane originally conceptualized this production for an in-the-round production at London’s cavernous Royal Albert Hall, so the scenery had to project. He says he was inspired by the “exquisite” setting of the 1968 Zeffirelli film to capture a cinematic quality in the ballet’s scenic designs. Scenic and costume designer, Roberta Guidi di Bagno, a native of Italy, brought his vision to life. Standout settings are the moonlit balcony scene and the eerie crypt with its somber procession of candle-bearing monks. Each performance features 63 characters, many of whom make multiple costume changes throughout the show.

2. Passions – and tensions – run high.  

This emotional roller coaster twists and turns from infatuation to fury and many fascinating shades in between. As they’re pushed to the brink of their emotions, protagonists reveal different sides of themselves, which creates unexpected and even startling moments between characters. The drama isn’t all in the sword-fighting scenes: Watch for evolving tensions among the members of the Capulet family, for example, and the character arcs that come along with it.

Romeo and Juliet Pittsburgh - Rehearsal photos
Dancers Amanda Cochrane and Yoshiaki Nakano rehearse Romeo and Juliet’s Balcony Scene. Photo by: Aimee DiAndrea.

3. But, the dancers keep it real.

Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet has earned its place on the pedestal of great literature, theater and film. But with its themes of forbidden love and societal stresses, the story has stood the test of time because it’s relatable to real people. For his adaptation, Deane returned to the original text to analyze the characters and what makes them tick. Among his favorite interpretations are Lady Capulet, Tybalt and Juliet. His Juliet is a strong woman who knows what she wants, someone who has “so many layers to her.” Deane describes Tybalt, the “King of Cats,” as “uncontrollable…always looking for trouble.” And with her overwrought reaction to her nephew, Tybalt’s, death, Lady Capulet claims one of the ballet’s reigning dramatic moments.  Unlike the fairy-tale themes of great 19th-century works like Swan Lake or La Sylphide, Romeo and Juliet is a 20th-century ballet with real-world themes. This sense of reality is paramount to Deane’s interpretation.

4. Prokofiev gives Tchaikovsky a run for his money. And the PBT Orchestra will be playing it live.

Many credit Prokofiev’s score for cementing Romeo and Juliet’s place among the major works in the ballet repertoire. The intense, richly varied music is particularly famous for its character portraits and an emotional range that contains notes of both tenderness and violence. Prokofiev composed the score in 1935, though it wasn’t performed as a ballet until 1938. Three suites and 10 piano pieces extracted from the score were the first to reach the public. Although it was intended for the Kirov ballet, “Romeo and Juliet” premiered instead in Brno, Czechoslovakia (now in the Czech Republic) in 1938. It didn’t debut in the Soviet Union until the Kirov staged it in 1940. NPR’s Ted Libbey, author of its “Listener’s Encyclopedia of Classical Music,” says “Romeo and Juliet is one of the most beautiful scores of the 20th century, and certainly one of the greatest compositions for the ballet stage, on a par with the great Tchaikovsky ballets.”

Romeo and Juliet Pittsburgh - Rehearsal photos
Dancers Yoshiaki Nakano and Amanda Cochrane rehearsing for Romeo and Juliet. Photo by: Aimee DiAndrea.

5. Without using one word, the dancing speaks volumes.

When it came time to translate Shakespeare’s poetry to motion, Deane first channeled the emotions of each encounter. “I visualize how the person should feel,” he said. Each dance carries its own emotional tenor from the lifts and elation of the balcony scene to the heartrending final dance in the crypt. Another choreographic feat can be found in the frenzied sword-fighting scenes between the feuding families. Two of Deane’s favorite moments sum up the ballet’s emotional extremes. One is Lady Capulet’s visceral reaction to Tybalt’s death, which Deane likens to a “Maria Callas moment.” But on the other side of the spectrum, he says, “I love that moment in the balcony pas de deux where they both realize there’s no way back. It’s destiny.”

One Weekend Only: Romeo and Juliet takes the stage April 21-23, at the Benedum Center. Tickets start at just $28. Get your tickets here or call 412-456-6666. Groups of 8+ can save up to 50% by calling 412-454-9101 or emailing groupsales@pittsburghballet.org.

Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre & Dance Theatre of Harlem

Featuring the Pittsburgh Jazz Orchestra

In Collaboration with Pittsburgh Dance Council and Pittsburgh Cultural Trust
Made possible with support from Richard King Mellon Foundation, The Benter Foundation, Edith L. Trees Charitable Trust and Richard E. Rauh

Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre joins forces with Dance Theatre of Harlem for an exciting collaboration at the August Wilson Center. In PBT’s first cross-company pairing, the two companies will present a mixed bill program celebrating the diversity of dance talent and styles in American ballet. A trailblazing company for classical dancers of diverse racial backgrounds, Dance Theatre of Harlem became a New York City institution in 1969 – the same year PBT was born in Pittsburgh. With five works on each eclectic program, the audience will see dance from choreographers, including Glen Tetley, Dwight Rhoden and Robert Garland, and hear music from artists, such as Johannes Brahms, Aretha Franklin, James Brown and Pittsburgh native Billy Strayhorn. Each company will perform signatures from its own repertoire, and the two troupes will collaborate on a staging of the bravura “Black Swan Pas de Deux” from Swan Lake.

Learn More

 

Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre & Dance Theatre of Harlem

Featuring the Pittsburgh Jazz Orchestra

In Collaboration with Pittsburgh Dance Council and Pittsburgh Cultural Trust
Made possible with support from Richard King Mellon Foundation, The Benter Foundation, Edith L. Trees Charitable Trust and Richard E. Rauh

Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre joins forces with Dance Theatre of Harlem for an exciting collaboration at the August Wilson Center. In PBT’s first cross-company pairing, the two companies will present a mixed bill program celebrating the diversity of dance talent and styles in American ballet. A trailblazing company for classical dancers of diverse racial backgrounds, Dance Theatre of Harlem became a New York City institution in 1969 – the same year PBT was born in Pittsburgh. With five works on each eclectic program, the audience will see dance from choreographers, including Glen Tetley, Dwight Rhoden and Robert Garland, and hear music from artists, such as Johannes Brahms, Aretha Franklin, James Brown and Pittsburgh native Billy Strayhorn. Each company will perform signatures from its own repertoire, and the two troupes will collaborate on a staging of the bravura “Black Swan Pas de Deux” from Swan Lake.

Learn More

 

#FacesOfBalletPgh: Zion Jackson & Bria Goldsmith

Students at Hill Dance Academy Theatre; aspiring professional dancers

Zion & Bria of Hill Dance Academy Theatre
Bria (left) and Zion (right) in the studio at Hill Dance Academy Theatre

It’s a Tuesday night in March, and Zion Jackson, 13, and Bria Goldsmith, 17, have just finished master classes with Dance Theatre of Harlem dancers Lindsey Croop and Chyrstyn Fentroy. They’ll admit to a few pre-class jitters, but these two are no strangers to dance. Both are long-time students at Hill Dance Academy Theatre (HDAT), where they dance ballet, jazz, Horton, tap, African, modern and Afro-Caribbean and took tonight’s master classes. Their academy was founded by Ayisha Morgan-Lee, a professional dancer with a Bachelor’s in Fine Arts from Howard University and a Master’s in Arts Management from Carnegie Mellon University Heinz College’s School of Public Policy & Management. The organization’s teaching artists include professional dancers, scholars and alumni, and its philosophy focuses on the dancer’s mind, body and spirit in a well-rounded program that prepares students for careers and life. For Zion and Bria, this philosophy rings true. Dance is central to their lives now, and both intend to build their futures around it. But regardless of what their future careers hold, they know it’s already changed them for life. Here are their stories:

How and when did you get your start in dance? What drew you to it?

Zion: “My first time coming to HDAT, I was 8 and my cousin did it. We used to always put on performances in my living room and show my parents, and they signed me up for dance. I also tried karate, but I was too graceful for it. So I did dance…When I first saw Misty Copeland’s performance on TV, I thought, ‘Hey that looks cool, I want to try that.’ It was very graceful. Of course it looked easy at it first, but it’s not easy (laughs).”

Bria: “I actually started because I came to one of HDAT’s summer intensive performances…my cousin (was performing). I was nine at the time and I didn’t do any outside activities, so my mom was like, ‘Do you want to try it?’ So that’s how I started dancing. I was never really a performer, I was more on the shy side. So I was thinking, maybe it would allow me to open up more and not be so timid and to myself and conservative…Something about dance just kept bringing me back in. I just enjoy it.”

How do you feel when you’re dancing?

Zion: “When I first started dancing I liked to stay to myself, and if I did do stuff, I liked to be in the back. But then as I started dancing I wanted to go to the front. When I dance I feel like I can touch someone in the audience. I feel loved by everybody around me. I feel like you develop a community around yourself. You feel like some people actually want to see you and are paying just to see you, so it’s kind of like a comfort feeling.”

Bria: “When I dance, I just feel a different type of energy coming out of me. Some people that are watching are not fortunate enough to dance for whatever reason, and I just want to make sure that I use this gift to the best of my ability, because everyone does not have the opportunity to dance. When I dance I try to make sure that I’m telling a story and that I’m just not going through the movement, but adding a little personality into it.”

What is your advice for someone who is on the cusp of trying someone new or expressing themselves through something like dance?

Zion: “At first it’s not going to be easy, but don’t give up. Don’t just take a class and be like, ‘OK I like it or I don’t like it.’ Make sure you keep taking classes, because in different classes you learn different things and you develop different feelings about dance. A lot of people say dance is your passion, but as it develops over time you can find that passion in dance.”

Bria: “Dance is very demanding. It takes a lot of work. But if you’re really passionate about it then maybe the work won’t really get to your head, because it’s something that you love. Also you shouldn’t worry about well, ‘She’s more flexible than me or she has better turnout than me’ or whatever it may be. It’s just you getting yourself better each day. I would just say, go for it. It’s a challenge, but if you continue to do it and continue to train, then your results will show.”

As a dancer, what do you take away from your ballet training, specifically, to improve your broader technique?  

Zion: “Whether you like ballet or not, it’s the basis of every dance. Everything drives from ballet just like Latin helps every other language form. In Horton, you always have to go navel to spine; even though the arms may be different, your main body frame and structure stays the same. Or in tap, you always have to stay on your toes or on the balls of your feet, so your relevé in ballet helps to make sure your calves are strong enough to do the exercises needed in different dances…Dance requires a lot of discipline, and ballet especially… Like posture in ballet: Some people will ask me, ‘Why are you sitting like that?’ And I didn’t even notice. Or I’ll be sitting and already pointing my feet, and I won’t notice that either. I feel like that influence in ballet, you carry it on through life.”

Bria: “Ballet is the foundation of all genres. Whatever genre you’re taking, ballet is going to show up in some way, shape or form. In ballet, you have to really understand the anatomy of your body. If you’re in any other genre, ballet is just there. That’s why I try each day in ballet to really get that down, so I can take it with me wherever I go.”

What was it like to take class with Dance Theatre of Harlem dancers?

Zion: “At first it was very intimidating. I see (Lindsey Croop) walk in, and I’m like, ‘Wow, she’s really graceful, she looks like she’s a really good dancer.’ And of course she is. I expected her to be really tough and hard on us, but she was very graceful and funny. She would also be really informative and tell us why we’re doing something, and make sure we’re breathing and just make sure that we’re doing what we’re supposed to (through) a friendly banter. You can see her personality. And when she danced and showed examples, you could see how her personality would show, which was a good influence on us.”

Bria: “It was kind of scary, because pointe isn’t really my strength at all and it’s just something that I have to continue to work on. But it turns out that she wasn’t as strict as I was expecting. She just really wanted us to know the different placements of our body. She wants to make sure that we’re dancing instead of doing the basics and just going through the movement. It was a nice class. She taught us some of her repertory, and it was really nice.”

Do you have a dancer role model?

Zion: “I think it would be Katherine Dunham or Pearl Primus. We had a choreographer come in and set some choreography on us that was choreographed by Pearl Primus, and I looked up how she used to dance. She was a very powerful woman and she was a very powerful dancer. She started in track…in something almost totally different from dance, so she inspires me.”

Bria: “Ingrid Silva. She is a dancer at Dance Theatre of Harlem. I watched her documentary a few days ago, and it just showed that you can do whatever you want to in life, no matter the obstacle or circumstance. It just really pushes me to make sure that whatever dream I have, I continue to go for that and I succeed no matter how long it will take me.”

What was your biggest takeaway from today’s master class?

Zion: “Our teacher today helped us understand that there are breathing points in ballet, and ballet is basically all breathing in the movement. Not to just do the movement, but to live in the moment. So while you’re living in the moment, you’re telling a story, and when you tell a story you have to breathe. Ballet is living…you have to breathe.”

Bria: “I learned to be more loose instead of being timid. She also taught that while we’re doing a fun and funky dance, make sure that you still continue to do the technique… the ballet foundation. Also I learned, you are your biggest competitor. Even though she didn’t say that bluntly, that’s what I got from it. You can’t compare yourself to whatever someone else has, you just have to fight to make sure that you’re better than what you were yesterday. That’s just the motto that I’m trying to keep with me throughout my dance career and I hope that takes me far.”

What are your plans for the future and for your career?

Zion: “I personally want to dance with Philadanco, because I like their style and how it’s really fast movement. It’s to its full extent. They do Horton, and that’s my favorite style of dance. Horton, Graham, Dunham, I like those types of dance styles, and Philadanco does that and it’s really upbeat. Every piece has a story behind it, and it’s really fast and I like that. And then I want to open my own dance company like Miss Ayisha has.”

Bria: “I’m a rising senior, so in college I do plan on dancing, depending on whether it’s a major or minor. Then, after college, if dance sticks with me throughout the four years, the company I would like to join is Ronald K. Brown Evidence. I just feel like that’s the company that I can relate most to. I think it was two years ago, they came to Pittsburgh and did an open community audition to perform with their dancers and I was picked among three other dancers. Right then and there I knew that I could see myself in that company when I grew up. I’ve seen a lot of companies, so me saying that now…says a lot. Hopefully I keep that mentality throughout my college years.”

What has dance given you that you’ll always carry with you, both within and beyond the dance world?

Zion: “Discipline. In dance there’s a lot of discipline. You have to know when to ask questions, when not to ask questions. Your posture. How to greet and make connections with people. The dance world is so small that you have to make different connections with different people and that will go a long way. In the real world it’s kind of like that…making different connections can get you pretty far in the dance world or not.”

Bria: “You have to network and put yourself out there and not be afraid to connect with other people. You might meet up with them a year later and you might be looking for a job and they might be one of the people who interview you and they might remember you. Not to be afraid to take on any challenge that comes your way and to never throw away an opportunity, because you never know where that could take you.”

Performing. Is that a big part of the equation for you – the ability to share your gift with others?

Zion: “My first time performing with HDAT I was 8 or 9…and even though I was in the back I felt like the spotlight was on me. I liked that feeling of having people watching you and coming just to see you. I like the rush of performing. Even backstage, preparing to perform, you meet so many people and there’s so many memories. Not everything is going to be perfect. Things go fast, and you have to be able to react quickly to those things. I have a lot of memories to take back with me before, during and after the performance.”

Bria: “It just brings you a satisfaction to know that you touched someone out in the audience in some type of way. I feel like dancing is just a way of life. Even if you don’t pursue that for the rest of your years, I feel like there’s always going to be a part of you that will always have a connection to dance. That’s where I am right now. I’m just trying to enjoy my last year here. I’m also in the stage of trying to find myself and trying to see how I’m unique and stand out from the rest.”

Why is it important to take class with and be exposed to people with different professional backgrounds?

Zion: “It keeps letting you get inspired to do different things and it helps you touch on different genres of dance that maybe you weren’t thinking about doing in the future or you haven’t done. I know sometimes in dance it gets really hard and it’s gets hard for you to keep moving on and pushing forward. When you keep having master classes, it inspires you to keep going so you can see the excellence that you can become when you get older.”

Bria: “It’s good to take master classes, because you never want to stay stuck on one style of dance. You want to get all the opportunities that you can to try other things, because you never know, you may like it. Also, taking master classes with different people, you may see them again. They may remember you…You just never know what you can get out of a master class. I just feel like it’s great to take every opportunity that you get.”

Why do you think dance is universal?

Zion: “I think dance is universal because I feel like whatever you do there’s going to be something that you love encrypted into it. Some people use dance as a stress reliever, and some people might use art, like coloring, as a stress reliever, so I feel like we all have different hobbies and different things that we can share with each other. To me, wherever I go, especially in Pittsburgh if you go to one of the cultural events, dancing is always part of the show. Or, you’ll see someone just getting up and dancing to their favorite song, whether it’s nodding their head or actually dancing. So even if you’re not taking classes 24/7, I feel like you still have a part of dance and that rhythm in your body.”

Bria “Dance is just one big community. The dance world is known to be small. Whenever you go out to different functions that revolve around dance, you can meet up with someone that you may have been in a master class with a few months ago…you can just meet people from all over. Also, I just feel that dance is in every type of activity. I know some football players take ballet classes for their muscles…or track…or any other type of sport. I just feel like dance is in everything and there’s no escaping it.”

We’re celebrating diverse, inspiring dance stories all month long. Join the dialogue and follow the series at #FacesOfBalletPgh.

Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre & Dance Theatre of Harlem

Featuring the Pittsburgh Jazz Orchestra

In Collaboration with Pittsburgh Dance Council and Pittsburgh Cultural Trust
Made possible with support from Richard King Mellon Foundation, The Benter Foundation, Edith L. Trees Charitable Trust and Richard E. Rauh

Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre joins forces with Dance Theatre of Harlem for an exciting collaboration at the August Wilson Center. In PBT’s first cross-company pairing, the two companies will present a mixed bill program celebrating the diversity of dance talent and styles in American ballet. A trailblazing company for classical dancers of diverse racial backgrounds, Dance Theatre of Harlem became a New York City institution in 1969 – the same year PBT was born in Pittsburgh. With five works on each eclectic program, the audience will see dance from choreographers, including Glen Tetley, Dwight Rhoden and Robert Garland, and hear music from artists, such as Johannes Brahms, Aretha Franklin, James Brown and Pittsburgh native Billy Strayhorn. Each company will perform signatures from its own repertoire, and the two troupes will collaborate on a staging of the bravura “Black Swan Pas de Deux” from Swan Lake.

Learn More

 

#FacesOfBalletPgh: Adon Quinerly

Adon-Quinerly performing in Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre School's Spring Performance at the Byham Theater.

Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre School student dancer; recipient of PBT’s Community Youth Scholarship

Adon Quinerly, a scholarship student at Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre SchoolAdon Quinerly was six years old when he auditioned for the inaugural class of Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre’s Community Youth Scholarship program. In his own words, “I thought it would be fun; I thought PBT would be a cool place to experience.” Now, at age 10, nearly four years into the training program, dance still makes Adon feel “happy.” He says his favorite part is “learning new dance moves” and picking up new choreography. Since joining PBT School’s Children’s Division, Adon has performed in the company’s main-stage production of The Nutcracker at the Benedum Center in addition to PBT School spring performances at the Byham Theater. Here’s why Adon’s pursuit of dance makes his mom, Maximillion Elliott-Quinerly, happy too.

Why do you think ballet is a good opportunity for Adon? Why did you decide to help him pursue or discover it?

“Dance was such a large part of my life during my pregnancy with Adon and directly after. I took him with me wherever I’d dance. When he was a baby, at times I would wear him when I taught or during congregational dances. I would grab a piece of cloth and wrap it around him and wrap him onto me.  As Adon grew, I began to incorporate him into the choreography whenever I could. Dance was very natural for him, as it was for me. Unfortunately for me, as a young person I did not have an opportunity to receive technical training. When I heard about PBT’s scholarship program, I wasn’t sure that Adon would want to pursue ballet in the way that he does.  However, I knew I had to at least put him in a position to have that option.  I wanted Adon to be able to explore his full potential in dance and not be limited by a limited dance vocabulary.  When he was awarded a scholarship with PBT, we were both very excited.  

Ballet is a beautiful language of discipline and grace, a foundational language from which one can build a dance vocabulary. I believe technical training offers the natural dancer an opportunity to expand their abilities and perfect their natural gift. Adon is developing beautifully under the guidance of PBT, and I am looking forward to watching his continued growth as a dancer and as a man.”

Why do you think these classes are an important part of his weekly routine and his life?

“The weekly routine is helping Adon to learn time management and prioritization of tasks. The discipline he is learning in ballet is transferrable to other areas of his life.”

Adon-Quinerly-performing-in-Pittsburgh-Ballet-Theatre's-The-Nutcracker
Adon Quinerly performing in Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre’s The Nutcracker

What do you think ballet brings out in Adon?

“Confidence.  Ballet is building Adon’s confidence and self-esteem; this is translating ballet into every area of his life.  Additionally, when he is at PBT and/or participating in PBT activities and performances there is a sense of community. He is a part of something that he loves and a part of a group of people who he is developing long-term relationships with.”

Why do you believe dance in general, and ballet in particular, is universal?

“I’ve spent almost a decade using dance as a platform to communicate with and bring together multi-cultural, multi-generational people from extremely diverse backgrounds. The language of dance transcends geographical, socio-economic, political and other boundaries; it draws people together to create beauty in community. Ballet in particular is a technical language that appears consistent cross-culturally. The issue is the foundational language is not known to all. This language, ballet, should be as accessible as one’s first language. However, even in the absence of audible cues, there is a kinesthetic teaching that takes place in dance. This way of teaching is invaluable particularly when one travels to teach.”

We’re celebrating diverse, inspiring dance stories all month long. Join the dialogue and follow the series at #FacesOfBalletPgh.

#FacesOfBalletPgh: Aditi Kumar

Aditi Kumar with her father at a Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre Adaptive Dance class.

Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre Adaptive Dance student

On a Saturday afternoon in March, eight-year-old Aditi Kumar walks through the front doors of Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre Studios with a spring in her step.

“I can’t believe this is my last ballet class,” she says wistfully, smiling up at her father, Kumar Sankaranarayan.

Her father returns the smile, reminding her that it’s just the end of her second “dance season,” but not the last class she’ll take. Aditi is part of PBT’s Adaptive Dance classes, a specialized class series developed for students with special needs. The 10-week class meets weekly on Saturdays at PBT Studios, where they learn ballet basics and modified choreography from classic ballets like The Nutcracker.

Simply put, Aditi says that dancing makes her feel happy.

And her joy is apparent.

As soon as she sets foot in the studio she’s off – chasséing large circles around the studio, and counting off each movement as she goes. Before class has even started, she announces that she’s glided through more than 50. It’s a talent that earned her the rank of “Chassé Queen” in the class.

Aditi Kumar takes class at Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre as part of the Adaptive Dance Program, a class series of students with special needs.
Aditi Kumar in the studio at Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre before an Adaptive Dance class.

“I love dancing,” she said.

But at one time, her parents questioned whether she would ever walk. Aditi has been diagnosed with Right Hemiplegia, a type of Cerebral Palsy, which is a disorder of movement, muscle tone or posture that is caused by damage that occurs to the developing brain, most often before birth.

“She likes it, which is a great thing. She looks forward to coming here. I think she genuinely likes the music,” Sankaranarayan says.

First and foremost, Aditi’s parents say that dancing brings her joy. But they think it also serves as a form of physical therapy rolled in with the art form.

“It’s a great feeling. Especially with her condition, we were not even sure whether she would walk, so to see her do some of the intricate dance movements is very satisfying to say the least,” Sankaranarayan says. “For example, holding the barre and going onto her tippy toes, for her condition it’s a very difficult thing to do. That is something she learned here. She has made good progress.”

And that’s not all Aditi has learned.

She ticks off a list of her favorite movements: Plie, saute, chassé. The french terminology rolls off her tongue, and a smile lights up her face. Her biggest accomplishment? The grand battement. And tiptoeing and jumping along the dots never disappoints.

Aditi Kumar with her Adaptive Dance teachers, Jamie Murphy and Kaila Lewis of Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre
Aditi Kumar with her Adaptive Dance teachers, Kaila Lewis (left) and Jamie Murphy (right), at Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre.

“I love Miss Kaila and Miss Jamie,” she says.

Sankaranarayan says Aditi also loves being part of a group activity, making new friends and getting to know her instructors, Jamie Murphy and Kaila Lewis.

“It takes a lot of patience and passion on the part of the teachers. They’re awesome. You can see they’re doing it with passion,” Sankaranarayan says. “As a parent of a child with special needs, we really appreciate that Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre is doing a program like this, which gives kids an opportunity to experience an art like this.”

We’re celebrating diverse, inspiring dance stories all month long. Join the dialogue and follow the series at #FacesOfBalletPgh.

Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre & Dance Theatre of Harlem

Featuring the Pittsburgh Jazz Orchestra

In Collaboration with Pittsburgh Dance Council and Pittsburgh Cultural Trust
Made possible with support from Richard King Mellon Foundation, The Benter Foundation, Edith L. Trees Charitable Trust and Richard E. Rauh

Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre joins forces with Dance Theatre of Harlem for an exciting collaboration at the August Wilson Center. In PBT’s first cross-company pairing, the two companies will present a mixed bill program celebrating the diversity of dance talent and styles in American ballet. A trailblazing company for classical dancers of diverse racial backgrounds, Dance Theatre of Harlem became a New York City institution in 1969 – the same year PBT was born in Pittsburgh. With five works on each eclectic program, the audience will see dance from choreographers, including Glen Tetley, Dwight Rhoden and Robert Garland, and hear music from artists, such as Johannes Brahms, Aretha Franklin, James Brown and Pittsburgh native Billy Strayhorn. Each company will perform signatures from its own repertoire, and the two troupes will collaborate on a staging of the bravura “Black Swan Pas de Deux” from Swan Lake.

Learn More

 

Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre & Dance Theatre of Harlem

Featuring the Pittsburgh Jazz Orchestra

In Collaboration with Pittsburgh Dance Council and Pittsburgh Cultural Trust
Made possible with support from Richard King Mellon Foundation, The Benter Foundation, Edith L. Trees Charitable Trust and Richard E. Rauh

Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre joins forces with Dance Theatre of Harlem for an exciting collaboration at the August Wilson Center. In PBT’s first cross-company pairing, the two companies will present a mixed bill program celebrating the diversity of dance talent and styles in American ballet. A trailblazing company for classical dancers of diverse racial backgrounds, Dance Theatre of Harlem became a New York City institution in 1969 – the same year PBT was born in Pittsburgh. With five works on each eclectic program, the audience will see dance from choreographers, including Glen Tetley, Dwight Rhoden and Robert Garland, and hear music from artists, such as Johannes Brahms, Aretha Franklin, James Brown and Pittsburgh native Billy Strayhorn. Each company will perform signatures from its own repertoire, and the two troupes will collaborate on a staging of the bravura “Black Swan Pas de Deux” from Swan Lake.

Learn More

 

Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre & Dance Theatre of Harlem

Featuring the Pittsburgh Jazz Orchestra

In Collaboration with Pittsburgh Dance Council and Pittsburgh Cultural Trust
Made possible with support from Richard King Mellon Foundation, The Benter Foundation, Edith L. Trees Charitable Trust and Richard E. Rauh

Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre joins forces with Dance Theatre of Harlem for an exciting collaboration at the August Wilson Center. In PBT’s first cross-company pairing, the two companies will present a mixed bill program celebrating the diversity of dance talent and styles in American ballet. A trailblazing company for classical dancers of diverse racial backgrounds, Dance Theatre of Harlem became a New York City institution in 1969 – the same year PBT was born in Pittsburgh. With five works on each eclectic program, the audience will see dance from choreographers, including Glen Tetley, Dwight Rhoden and Robert Garland, and hear music from artists, such as Johannes Brahms, Aretha Franklin, James Brown and Pittsburgh native Billy Strayhorn. Each company will perform signatures from its own repertoire, and the two troupes will collaborate on a staging of the bravura “Black Swan Pas de Deux” from Swan Lake.

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#FacesOfBalletPgh: Chyrstyn Fentroy of Dance Theatre of Harlem

Chyrstyn-Fentroy & Francis Lawrence, Dance Theatre of Harlem
Chyrstyn Fentroy in "When Love"
Chyrstyn Fentroy in “When Love”

#FacesOfBalletPgh: Chyrstyn Fentroy
Dance Theatre of Harlem dancer

Dance Magazine has praised Chyrstyn Fentroy, of Dance Theatre of Harlem, for her “chameleon-like adaptability,” “technical prowess” and “charismatic stage presence.” Pittsburghers saw it all firsthand when she performed opposite DTH’s Jorge Andrés Villarini at Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre’s Pointe in Time: Gala Giselle in November. The Los Angeles native left guests enthralled with her evocative performance of Vessels, and she’s now dancing in several works on the PBT+DTH program in Pittsburgh. Fentroy trained with Ruth Fentroy and with Joffrey Ballet before joining Dance Theatre of Harlem, where she’s in her fifth year as a company member. Dance Magazine recognized her among its “25 Dancers to Watch” of 2015 and featured her as its cover artist for the month. She’s also a recipient of the 2016-2017 Princess Grace Honorarium, a prestigious honor for emerging talents in theater, dance and film. Here is what makes this talent tick:

Describe your first encounter with ballet. What hooked you?

“My mom was a professional ballet dancer, so I was introduced to the art form at a very young age. I remember growing up watching her perform from the wings. By the time I was 3 I had even learned the entire “Sugar Plum Fairy” just from watching her so often. I think growing up seeing her amazing musicality really gave me a deep appreciation not only for ballet but also for music. Often times I can hear a piece of music and I can almost feel the music inside of me and I have a lot of fun taking class and rehearsing solo works and trying to find all of the different ways I can play with the music. It really keeps me engaged and excited to come back for more.”

When was your ballet “epiphany” – the moment you knew you wanted to pursue this art form not only as a hobby but as a career?

“I knew this was something that I really loved and wanted to pursue as a career when I spent my first summer alone in New York City. Something about the idea of waking myself up in the busy city to head into the studio to work towards a new goal every day became sort of an addiction to me. I love learning something new about myself and the world around me every day, and ballet is a tool that really allows me to do that.”

Chyrstyn Fentroy and Francis Lawrence in "Tchaikovsky Pas de Deux"Photo by: Renata Pavam
Chyrstyn Fentroy and Francis Lawrence in “Tchaikovsky Pas de Deux”Photo by: Renata Pavam

What was one challenge that you had to overcome in order to make your dream a reality?

“When I began studying ballet full-time, I was your stereotypical “bun-head.” I was obsessed with perfection. I was obsessed to the point where I was inflicting damage on my mental and physical health. I would get incredibly angry at myself for anything that I considered the tiniest bit of failure unknowing that I was setting the bar impossibly high for myself, but fortunately I came across a teacher that gave me a serious reality check. Simply put – he told me that no director would ever want to hire an angry dancer. And as simple and obvious as that statement may seem, it really turned on a light in my mind and I began working on myself from the inside out and doing so, I fell in love with the freedom I found in loving myself and what I was given. No one is perfect and everyone has something to offer.”

What is it about ballet, and dance, that sustains your dream and rewards your hard work?

“Lately, I have been really intrigued by works that allow me to have a voice louder than my own. I know that I may not be able to make a difference in the world in one day, but the idea that I might be able to give power to someone who can is incredibly empowering. I want to continue to deliver the message of those today and those who came before me. I want to use my body to provoke thought and be heard.

Overall, in a world that is chaotic and often times dark, dancing reminds me that I am alive. That I am only human – but also that I am human! The possibilities that lie within our bodies and minds are endless!”

Chyrstyn Fentroy and Jorge Andrés Villarini in "When Love"
Chyrstyn Fentroy and Jorge Andrés Villarini in “When Love”

What excites you about ballet’s future and its possibilities?

“I think that the ever-changing world around us influences all forms of art and that alone excites me because it means that I will always learn and explore something new and that there will always be room for growth and new forms of inspiration that I may not have ever expected.”

When you dance, what do you hope to impart through your performances?

“Every time I step on the stage, it is my goal to make the audience feel something different than what they felt when they walked in the building. And that can be something different for every person, whether it be a reminder of the time they fell in love or what it feels to be angry. I want to be a relatable artist because when it comes down to it the thing that every person on this planet can relate to is being human. An audience member may not be able to understand a tendu or many pirouettes, but we all are human; we all feel.”

Why do you think ballet – a centuries-old art form – remains relevant to people today in 2017?

“As I mentioned before, ballet continues to evolve as the world does. New choreographers and innovators are born every day with a modern view on what dance should be in comparison to everything happening around us. I think it’s these new creations and the pairing of them with the restaging of classics that keeps ballet relevant – a reminder of what dance was created to be and a look into the future and its endless possibilities.”

What advice would you give a young dance student today (or yourself at a younger age)?

“I think that I would tell a younger me, or a young dance student today, to find the beauty in yourself as an individual. Comparing yourself to others does nothing to benefit you because you are not, and will never be anyone but you. Love yourself first, love your art, and then share that love with the world. Keep your ears open and let the music become your heart. Most of all find a way to feel free in your dancing, because it is your freedom in movement that will bring you nothing but pure joy, always.”

We’re celebrating diverse, inspiring dance stories all month long. Join the dialogue and follow the series at #FacesOfBalletPgh.

#FacesOfBalletPgh: Dr. Melonie Nance

Dr. Melonie Nance, co-chair of the Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre + Dance Theatre of Harlem commitee
Dr. Melonie Nance, co-chair of the Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre + Dance Theatre of Harlem commitee

#FacesOfBalletPgh: Dr. Melonie Nance
ENT otolaryngologist, Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre Trustee, PBT + Dance Theatre of Harlem committee co-chair

Dr. Melonie Nance is a surgeon, a wife and a mother. But for much of her life, she was a dancer. It shaped her identity then, and it remains part of it today.

Dr. Nance threw body and soul into ballet beginning at age 8. In high school she made the difficult decision to prioritize academics, and a future career in medicine, over a rigorous pre-professional training schedule. In college, she rekindled her passion for dancing and performing, but faced an inner conflict with the dance form she’d grown up loving.

Now, years later, her 3.5-year-old daughter, Lalitha, is the one dancing. And, as a member of the Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre Board of Trustees and co-chair of the committee supporting PBT’s collaboration with Dance Theatre of Harlem, Dr. Nance is back to playing an integral role in the art form she’s loved for so long.

Here, she shares what drew her to ballet, what pushed her away, and ultimately what brought her back.

How did you first get into ballet?

“My mom took me to ballet when I was little. But she tells me that even when I was 3 years old I was the one that asked her if I could go to dance class. I took ballet when I was a little girl – ballet, tap and jazz – and then stopped when school got started and a I took piano and other things. When I was 8 years old I wanted to go back to ballet, and my mom wanted me to go to a place that was teaching serious ballet. She took me to the library before I started, and we checked out a book on the positions in ballet. We reviewed, and then she started me in classical ballet training at age 8.

I stopped in high school because it was getting to be the point where everybody was becoming pre-professional and you had to go five and six times a week and I had to stop and do my homework. It was a big decision. I sat down with my ballet teacher, Miss Ludmilla Dokodovsky, and we talked about it, and I told her that I wanted to go into medicine. When I went into college I started dancing again. I danced the entire time I was in college in almost every dance concert they had. It was a small school, and you didn’t have to be a dance major to be in every performance. It was modern dance and some ballet. A lot of students got to choreograph their own stuff, which was exciting. Three of my best friends in college were dance majors, so I was basically a dance major without the paperwork.”

What about ballet had you hooked?

“I love classical music. I think for me as a person, what I generally gravitate toward is something that is regimented and very difficult. I think that’s probably why I went into medicine too. I just liked the structure of it. I think it’s very analytical, the way you have to learn the combinations and stay on top of the music. I like the physicality of it. I love that it keeps you in shape. Even though you’re doing an art form it’s really totally physical training. Even now as I’ve tried to stay in shape and I go to the gym or yoga or pilates, it’s not the same.”

Dr. Melonie Nance as a middle school dancerHow do you feel ballet has shaped you as a person?

“For me, I’ve always been a person that can be really good at things without working too hard — but only certain things. So if something wasn’t easy for me, I would just do something else. But, ballet wasn’t easy for me at the beginning. My teacher, Miss Ludmilla, was just there, with me, on me, and she pushed me. Without that one-on-one interaction from her, I probably would have let it go earlier than I did. I remember specific days when she would come up to me in class and say, ‘Look at these muscles coming out. This is because you’re taking class so many times a week…’ or ‘Your body shape is good for doing really high jumps.’ She would do that with everyone. She would say, ‘you have the gift of having extension,’ or ‘look how you can turn.’ Everybody felt like they had these special gifts.”

Did you face any challenges in your pursuit of ballet?

“I don’t know if I felt actual racism in our dance school. There were a few other girls of color and boys of color in our dance company, and I felt that they got the roles that were commensurate with their level of talent. I didn’t feel that I couldn’t (achieve a role because of my color). I did know that I was one of the only ones, but that wasn’t really different from all of my other school activities.

But I have to talk about this other issue that I’ve had with ballet. When I was in college I came in as someone who had taken all of this classical ballet. Most of the classes were modern dance, so I had to kind of let that go, let it go out of my body. My best friend in college was a choreographer, and she was not a ballet dancer. She explained to me how ballet is Eurocentric, and that ballet pushed these European standards of beauty onto all dancers.These concepts expanded my mind, allowing me to see that there are so many types of dance besides ballet. During that time of my life, it was sort of uncool for me to love ballet because of the cultural references. It made me feel like I couldn’t love ballet as much because I was supposed to be searching for my own culture. I mean, I’m glad that it happened to me because it really opened my mind. You don’t have to have ballet training to be a good dancer, which I think is one of the main points she was trying to assert.

When I came to Pittsburgh and was in my residency, I took ballet for exercise, because I knew that was the best way for me to work out my body. It still is. Not until the last five years, when I started to really be involved in PBT and (a friend) got me back into ballet, did I realize that it’s OK for me to love ballet. And then with Misty (Copeland’s promotion to principal at American Ballet Theatre), it also helped me be like, ‘Hey I can love ballet and be a black woman.’ While in the past, I felt like I shouldn’t express my love for ballet because it was so European. But I don’t care anymore, I love ballet!

Now I think if we’re open to cultural diversity then…I think everyone can participate in it now and enjoy it in so many different ways. I’m glad that people are pushing to broaden and participate in their own way. I think the whole concept of Misty Copeland has allowed black girls, and women, to love ballet and proudly participate in it as a welcome part of the art form. There are so many different types of ballet choreographers now from all different cultures. I think we’re going to see a big widening and broadening of the field and what is ballet.”

Dr. Melonie Nance performing in college
Dr. Melonie Nance performing in college

Did it help you discover an inner joy or sense of expression?  

“Yeah, I think so. In high school you get to be involved in this whole other world. I played music, I played the flute and I was in band. I didn’t feel as much of an ability of self-expression as I do with dance and with ballet. Even after I stopped taking a lot of the high-intensity class schedules for ballet, I always was known as a dancer at school. I choreographed the school musical and other things. I felt like people knew me as a special talent. I won the talent show in sixth grade, so after that everyone knew that I was a ballet dancer.”

Dr. Melonie Nance's daughter, Lalitha, in her first ballet class at Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre.
Dr. Melonie Nance’s daughter, Lalitha, at age 1.5, in her first ballet class at Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre.

Now your daughter, Lalitha, is taking ballet classes. What do you see it bringing to your daughter’s life?

“I was so excited to take her (to her first Mommy and Me ballet class at Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre). I was like, ‘OK, you gotta get this under control because this is not about you anymore…I don’t want to push this on you.’ But she really loved it. I should share part of something I wrote to her on that day…

Dear Daughter,

On your first dance class, I may have been overjoyed about the fact that this happened today. I am not going to push you. But I do feel a special fulfillment in sharing something I love so much with you… I hope someday that you love something as much as I have loved and still love to dance — ballet and many other forms. God help me to open doors to many opportunities for you to choose your passion — whatever they may turn out to be…

Right now both of my little girls love ballet, and they’re around it a lot because of my involvement. If they really want to do it they certainly can. What I’m excited about is that they see so many girls of color in their dance classes and onstage…Lalitha just thinks it’s a regular thing. If they want to, the door is so wide open, but I certainly don’t want to push them. Right now it’s just about exposure.”

 

Why is this collaboration important to you personally and why do you think it’s important for our community?

“I just think it’s a doorway to get a whole bunch of people connected…It allows people to fall in love with ballet who may have thought ballet isn’t for me or it’s not for us. If they’re excited about Dance Theatre of Harlem and they come and see, I think people will get excited for the kids who may have opportunities to do ballet in a way that maybe they didn’t feel was a door that was open to them. I just feel like most people in Pittsburgh, when you talk about Dance Theatre of Harlem, get really excited. They’re excited about the history of DTH and how hard they’ve had to work to be there. Some of that same history is at PBT too in a different way. I think that it’s a real stepping stone to really widen the audience and widen the opportunities for kids in Pittsburgh to come and take ballet. It’s not going to be everyone’s career, for sure, but it can be a really important part of your upbringing.”

One thing that’s kind of funny is that my husband has never seen my dance. All the people who know me now, they know me as doctor, as a physician, as a mom. People that knew me in college and in high school and younger, they knew me as a dancer. They can’t believe I’m a doctor now. It’s so funny, because it’s so much of my identity in the past.  I’m so glad now it’s becoming part of my identity in a new way.”

 

Meet Virginia Johnson: From Prima Ballerina to Dance Theatre of Harlem Artistic Director

Virginia Johnson, artistic director, Dance Theatre of Harlem, visits Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre.
Virginia Johnson, artistic director, Dance Theatre of Harlem

Virginia Johnson is a dance icon. She joined Dance Theatre of Harlem in 1969 as a founding company member, and prima ballerina, and returned to it in 2009 as its artistic director.

Born in Washington, DC, Johnson graduated from the Academy of the Washington School of Ballet. She briefly attended the School of the Arts at New York University as a University Scholar before joining DTH in 1969. During her 28 years with the company she performed most of the repertoire, with principal roles in Concerto Barocco, Allegro Brillante, Agon, A Streetcar Named Desire, Fall River Legend, Swan Lake, Giselle, Voluntaries, Les Biches and others.

Three DTH productions in which she danced leading roles were recorded for broadcast: A Streetcar Named Desire for Dance in America on PBS, Creole Giselle, which was the first full-length ballet broadcast on NBC, and Fall River Legend, which won a cable ACE award from the Bravo Network. In addition, she was included in two acclaimed television dance series, Margot Fonteyn’s The Magic of Dance and Natalia Makarova’s Ballerina.

While still performing, her interest in journalism led her to Fordham University where she continues to pursue a degree in communications. After retiring from performing, She founded Pointe Magazine and was editor-in-chief from 2000-2009.

Her honors include a Young Achiever Award from the National Council of Women, Outstanding Young Woman of America and the Dance Magazine Award, a Pen and Brush Achievement Award and the Washington Performing Arts Society’s 2008-2009 Pola Nirenska Lifetime Achievement Award and the 2009 Martha Hill Fund Mid-Career Award.

Here is her story, her advice and her vision for the future of ballet.

When, where and why did you first get involved in ballet? What hooked you?

“I grew up in Washington, D.C., and my mother was in a women’s club of many people that had gone to school together, grown up in childhood and stuck together as friends. It was a very close-knit group. I had this friend named Therrell Smith, who was the daughter of a doctor, so they were the wealthier of the folks in the group. Therrell Smith had fallen in love with classical ballet as a young person. She really wanted to study ballet but couldn’t find any place to teach her. Of course we’re talking about the 1940s, the 1950s, and the idea of black people dancing ballet just did not exist, nor were any of the studios integrated, so there wasn’t any place that she could go to study ballet. But, as I said, she was the daughter of a doctor so she had the resources to take herself off to Paris where she studied and got her training in ballet. And she came back to Washington and opened up her own dance studio. My mom wanted to support her friend and send her two daughters off to study with Therrell… I fell in love with it. I think I was infected by Therrell’s love of the art form. I also just loved the music and loved the movement and loved the sense of order that you felt — everything in its place and everything right. It was something that I fell in love with right away.

I just loved the music and loved the movement and loved the sense of order that you felt – everything in its place and everything right. It was something that I fell in love with right away.

I want you to know that I was a little bit of an ugly duckling. I didn’t have any sense of rhythm and I couldn’t quite get it for many years, but I still loved it. It was a love-hate relationship for a good long time. I think I have a deep sense of, what is it, masochism. Because it’s a very difficult art form and I was always disappointed in what I was doing, as you’ll hear from many ballet dancers. But I also believed in the ideal that I was trying to achieve and pursuing that ideal was really why I did it. It’s something that’s always just beyond your reach. And that’s what makes you get up in the morning and makes you keep pushing through hard times. You know there’s something really beautiful ahead of you if you can just make yourself do it.”

But I also believed in the ideal that I was trying to achieve and pursuing that ideal was really why I did it. It’s something that’s always just beyond your reach. And that’s what makes you get up in the morning and makes you keep pushing through hard times. You know there’s something really beautiful ahead of you if you can just make yourself do it.”

Was there a turning point or epiphany moment when you chose to pursue ballet as your career?  
“I don’t know, I think I must have always imagined myself on the stage. I don’t remember a particular point. I did seek out many performance opportunities as a young person. I performed with the Children’s Theatre in Washington and Therrell would have her annual recital. So those things were constantly out there. I think I kind of assumed that I would be on the stage.”

What was it like to dance during the Civil Rights Movement, through segregation, through this time in American history? What types of challenges did you encounter? How did you work through them and keep pushing?

“There were so many people that told me that I didn’t belong in ballet. Things that I just didn’t hear. When I graduated from the Academy of the Washington School of Ballet, where Mary Day had me as a full scholarship student for three years, she said to me, ‘you know what, you’re just not going to be a ballerina. You’ve got all kinds of talent, but there’s no place for you in ballet.’ That was the first time that I actually heard it with any seriousness. But she said this to me as I was leaving. So I thought, well you gave me the best training I could possibly have had knowing that there was no place for me to go. But you did it anyway, so I thank you for that.

I think you’ve heard from a lot of people who are not necessarily caucasian that you don’t think of yourself as ‘the other’ until somebody tells you that you are. I thought of myself as a normal person pursuing a dream. And I had to have these reminders thrown at me that I wasn’t a normal person and I didn’t have a right to that dream. So when I got to New York, I was at NYU in the dance department, and somebody said that Arthur Mitchell was teaching ballet classes in Harlem on Saturdays…That was when I found out he was creating the Dance Theatre of Harlem and I lobbied with my parents to give me the chance to drop out of school and pursue this dream in the basement of a church in Harlem.

The thing that was really interesting was that it was the 1960s and it was the middle of the Civil Rights Movement and it was also the National Black Arts Movement where people were going, ‘Why are you trying to do the white man’s art form. You should be doing African dance.’ Well, who is anybody aside from me to say what I should do with my life? Black people. White people. Yellow people. Purple people. I’m an individual. I have a dream, I should be able to pursue that dream.

Well, who is anybody aside from me to say what I should do with my life? Black people. White people. Yellow people. Purple people. I’m an individual. I have a dream, I should be able to pursue that dream.

So it was an interesting time, but I think it also cemented my commitment to being a ballerina. And Dance Theatre of Harlem gave me the chance to make it mean something more than just my pleasure. It was about saying, ‘Look. Self-definition is part of being an American. And let us show you how black people can do ballet. How not just black people, but how anyone, given opportunity and access, can do ballet.’”

What special quality did you bring to your performances?

“I just loved dancing. I loved, loved dancing. I think that love is something that communicated. It’s just the joy of being able to do this thing.”

What are some of your most unforgettable performance moments?

“My strength was the dramatic ballets and I did a number of them. It was always such a great thing to be in the middle of a ballet like Giselle or Fall River Legend or even A Streetcar Named Desire where everything disappears and you’re just living this reality that doesn’t exist. That it could be so real was always an amazing thing to me…that sensation of reality always surprised me.”

Throughout your years in the field, from founding member of Dance Theatre of Harlem to its artistic director, what types of changes have you witnessed in ballet?

“The ballet world has come a long, long, long, long, long way from the world that I grew up in. Well, in some ways it has and in some ways I see vestiges of it lying around. But when I was growing up, dancers were expected to be little cloistered nuns who danced all day until their toes were bloody and then came home and washed their tights and went to bed. They didn’t eat anything, they didn’t talk to anybody and they didn’t have any ideas in their heads because they were just the vessels for somebody to turn into art. That’s an antique image that is horrible when you think about it. And I think it’s not true at all…The real thing is that nowadays artistic directors want students who are smart, who have information, who can bring something to the table, who are mature.

The real thing is that nowadays artistic directors want students who are smart, who have information, who can bring something to the table, who are mature.

So that idea of being vessels to be filled by somebody else’s vision is no longer current and I think that’s fantastic. Ballet dancers are dedicated, strong and I think it’s a sense of responsibility that’s just not the same image as before. And I’m very pleased about that. I try to encourage (my dancers) to be thinkers, to solve problems for themselves, to understand what they’re doing and how it works.”

What is one thing that you think we in the ballet world need to work harder to change?

“Just the notion of what this classical art form is. It doesn’t belong in the 19th century, it belongs in the 21st century and we need to be defining how it does. Our audiences have become addicted to these wonderful story ballets. They don’t understand the other things that we’re doing, so let us help them understand. Because this is a communicative art, and we need to have people want to come to ballet because it gives them something they can’t find anywhere else.”

What is your advice to young dancers today?

“I definitely do suggest that they work harder and that they work smarter — that they don’t work just to work hard, but that they work to achieve a very specific goal. That they need to be informed about their art form, about the music, about the history, about how it comes together. When a choreographer comes in to set something to a piece of music they should be trying to find out more about the composer, about the history of that music… Be curious. Ah, be curious. That’s what it is. I think because we learn ballet by people telling us, we think that anything we need to know we’ll be told. We need to be out seeking for more, enriching our work as dancers.”

What are you most proud of about Dance Theatre of Harlem’s contributions to ballet as an art form?

“I think it really is doing what Arthur Mitchell set out to do to have people look at this art form with new eyes. Because we are unexpected. I try really hard for our repertoire to be unexpected as well. So that people don’t say, ‘Oh I know what that is.’ Again, we go back to that word: curiosity.”

What do you hope to see in ballet’s future? What types of possibilities do you see?

“Dance Theatre of Harlem is a touring company. And even though it’s really horribly hard work that I wouldn’t want to wish on anybody, I also wish it on everyone. Because it’s an amazing thing to travel around this country and see the similarities and the differences in communities across the country and to be able to engage with people in different places. There’s a commonality that we all need to plug into and I feel like the arts are the thing that brings people together.

There’s a commonality that we all need to plug into and I feel like the arts are the thing that brings people together.

So  I would wish for that amazing touring program that was part of the ‘80s to come back so that companies like PBT and Dance Theatre of Harlem and Cincinnati and Houston and all these companies could travel around with all their vision of ballet is so that people could understand how rich it is. It’s not just one thing.”

Who were your role models as a young person? Were there dancers who inspired and empowered you at any moment in your career similar to what’s happening now with Misty Copeland?

“When I was growing up in Washington, in junior high school, they took us to see Martha Graham perform at a theater in Washington.I wasn’t all that interested because it was modern dance. But there’s this moment when Mary Hinkson steps onto the stage. She was one of the early members of the Graham company and just a sublime dancer, the most exquisite dancer you can imagine. She stepped onto the stage and I sat bolt upright in my seat.  I was like, ‘Oh my God. There’s somebody who looks like me on the stage.’ I didn’t know that I had missed myself on the stage before that moment. I didn’t know that I had been looking for some kind of affirmation of my desire to be on the stage, but in that moment I really felt it.

I was like, ‘Oh my God. There’s somebody who looks like me on the stage.’ I didn’t know that I had missed myself on the stage before that moment. I didn’t know that I had been looking for some kind of affirmation of my desire to be on the stage, but in that moment I really felt it.

It’s kind of a weird thing. It’s not something that’s in the front of your brain, but it’s in the back of your brain.

The eight years that DTH was not touring I think were a setback in terms of young dancers of color feeling like there was a  place for them in ballet because most of the companies didn’t have a dancer of color, most of the schools didn’t have anybody that made them feel welcome. Unless you’re a total maniac, why do you push yourself to do something that’s not welcoming. That notion of a role model is an important one. On March 19, 2017 we’re actually celebrating the 100th anniversary of Janet Collins, who was the first ballerina of color to perform at the Metropolitan Opera. She had quite an amazing life, but if you say the name Janet Collins to someone right now, they’re not going to know who she is. And yet, she was a trailblazer. She was a person who made it possible for me to do what I did.

It goes in waves like that. I’m glad that Misty Copeland has captured the imagination of so many people, because it’s important for people to have that kind of inspiration. She’s not the first, she’s not going to be the last. But, it’s somebody that you can look to and say, I can do that too.”

What are you looking forward to about our collaboration in Pittsburgh and why do you think it’s important?

“I think it’s so fantastic for Terry to invite us to be part of this performance series. Being at the August Wilson Center is going to be so amazing. I know the history of the center. I certainly am a…fan is the wrong word when you think about August Wilson as a writer, as a chronicler of American experience. It’s so meaningful that this is happening. We’re at this moment where we’re almost there. We’re full of anxiety and full of anticipation and just like, OK it’s really going to happen now. This is a wonderful opportunity and I’m so grateful for it.”


 

#FacesOfBalletPgh: Daniela Moya

Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre dancer Daniela Moya in "Serenade." Choreography by George Balanchine. © The George Balanchine Trust

There’s Only Plan A: Why One Ballerina Followed Her Dream to the United States

For Daniela Moya, ballet has always been part of the plan. She started dancing at age 4 – an age when “ballerina” isn’t an uncommon career aspiration. But for Daniela, this was no passing phase. Ballet had her hooked – from the rigor of training to its release of emotion – and she became determined to make it her life’s work. Six years ago, the PBT Corps de Ballet dancer left her family, friends and hometown of Mexico City to chase her dream to the United States. She accepted a spot in Joffrey Ballet’s trainee program in Chicago and went on to train in the PBT School Graduate Program before signing with the company in 2016. The transition hasn’t been without its challenges. Thanks to the love of dance and the support of Facetime, family visits and her loyal pups, she can still confidently say, “there’s only Plan A…and there’s only going forward.”

Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre dancer Daniela Moya
Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre dancer Daniela Moya

Describe your first encounter with ballet. What hooked you?

“My first encounter was when I was four. My mom took me because the doctor said ballet would help (with my posture). I walked like a duck. I just really liked ballet and the challenge of it. It’s really disciplined. Technique-wise, it’s not where your body wants to go naturally. You don’t force it, but you have to train your body to move that way for it to be correct. That’s the hard part. Also, what I love about it is the artistry you can bring to it so that it looks effortless and natural.”

When was your ballet “epiphany” – the moment you knew you wanted to pursue this art form not only as a hobby but as a career?

“Since I was little I always said I was going to be a ballerina. That was always my thing. My parents were like, ‘Yeah, yeah, sure, sure, you’ll grow out of it.’ And then one summer intensive (at the Royal Ballet) when I was a teenager, I went to London and it was one of the first times that I went out of the country and away from my family. We created this production at the end of the program, and my mom came to watch. Just waiting in the wings to go out gave me that adrenaline rush, and I thought, ‘I want this. This is it.’”

What was one challenge that you had to overcome in order to make your dream a reality?

“There were many – but three in particular. First of all was my posture. In order to do ballet, I really had to concentrate. And still today, I try to focus on my posture, because it’s my weak point. Second was trying to like myself in order to be healthy. You look at yourself in the mirror in a leotard and then you get obsessed with how skinny you are. It was overcoming that mental (fixation) on how I looked. You just need to dance and not focus on your body. Third was just moving away from my family. When the moment came it was, ‘Yep, I’m going (snaps fingers).’ But once I was here I thought, wow I did leave everything behind. (But now) there’s only going forward…I guess my mind was set on Plan A. My mom was like, ‘but what if it doesn’t work out? Just come back. Plan B.’ And I said, ‘No, there’s only Plan A.’ I already moved away. I left everything – my friends, my family. I’m by myself. There’s only one way. Whatever means moving forward. That was it.”

What makes all of the hard work and sacrifice worth it to you?

“I guess just getting better. You could be at the top of your class, and then you move to another class and you’re at the bottom again. When I moved to Chicago, it was completely different, but I really wanted it. (Sometimes you think) maybe I’m not good enough. I think I am, but maybe I’m not. But then you have meetings and people keep pushing for you and telling you it’s the right thing to do, that you should be dancing. Sometimes the encouragement was the only thing that kept me going. I thought, OK I’m doing the right thing, so I just kept going.”

Culture-wise, the food adjustment was the most difficult. I had to figure out what to eat to be healthy and that was easy (to prepare) – trying to figure out what to make and modify. I always missed my Mexican food. Also the hours of eating are so different than back home. Food is huge (to my culture at home). When my mom is here, we just go out to eat (laughs). My first year was really lonely and then I got my dog. I mean I had friends, I met Diana Yohe (a fellow Joffrey trainee and current PBT dancer), and then I got my dog and I was like OK, now I’m good.”

What advice would you give an aspiring dance or to your younger self?

“I would have said to start earlier. I would just say to not give up. I had those moments of doubt. I might have wasted a little more time trying to figure it out instead of to keep pushing. Patience and perseverance will get you somewhere.”

What rewards all of your hard work? What makes it all worth it?

“What makes it worth it is that I’m still dancing. This is funny, but I made a note to myself with a friend back at home and what we’d be doing when we were 25. I looked back at it when I turned 25…It was to be in a professional company, to be dancing, to have traveled. I think I’ve accomplished a lot of that. It’s been my dream, so it’s just still rewarding that I’m still dancing.”

What excites you about ballet’s future and its possibilities?

“I think it’s always changing. There’s new choreographies and new music. There are new ideas that may not be classical, but I think that’s part of the challenge – to try to be versatile and learn to move however your body can move. It’s fun, because I feel like people are getting more educated about ballet, so more people come to see it and realize that it’s fun to watch. You don’t have to dance it (to enjoy it)…It’s an art form but it’s also athletic and it’s also entertaining. You just have to try it and see if you like it.”

Why do you think dance is universal?

“I feel like it’s a different kind of language. I’ve seen it with me, coming to a different country, maybe meeting a dancer from Japan, for example. Maybe we don’t share the same language, but we dance. We can get together and have the same dance. You express yourself, your feelings. You can show the music. It’s pretty diverse. You can speak through it.”

What advice would you give a young dance student today (or yourself at a younger age)?  

“Just do it. Life doesn’t work without risks. It’s boring. I’m going to sound super cheesy, but there’s a saying, ‘Find the job that you’re passionate about and then you don’t have to work the rest of your life.’ I just want to dance.”

Why do you find the PBT & DTH collaboration so exciting?

“It’s very inspiring to see another company work and perform so close. Just like in the real world, having connections and integrating ourselves with other people (in this case dancers) is so beneficial. We learn a new perspective, and like I said before, we have the same language.  It is just how we express that language and wish to share that artistry with the public that is different for both companies and individual dancers.”