Photo Gallery: From Ballet Students to Stars

See the next generation of professional dancers, including newly hired company members Christian García Campos and Tommie Kesten, on stage this month in PBT School’s Pre-professional Showcases and Spring Performance 2018.

Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre School’s Pre-professional Division is a training ground for the next generation of aspiring dancers. According to Artistic Director Terrence S. Orr, “The Pre-professional Division is where dancers begin making the transition from student to professional. At this stage, dancers are honing their performance skills, cultivating their individuality as artists and testing their technique in company repertoire.” PBT’s company roster is a testament to this — Orr has recruited more than half of its dancers from the Pre-professional Division. Here, get an exclusive look at our stars while they were still students:

 

10 Summer Intensive Takeaways

The launch of PBT School’s annual Intensive Summer Program quickly brings PBT to life during the company’s quiet summer break.  Students ages 12-22 flow out into the hallways and lounges during their breaks; stretching, talking, and relaxing in their downtime.  They practice six days a week, spending over 180 hours in the studio. But, in talking to 10 of these 225 students you wouldn’t realize the intensity of their schedule unless you asked. Their passion out shined any fatigue they may have felt as they described some of their biggest challenges and lessons from the past five weeks.

10 Summer Intensive TakeawaysAllison Durand
Age: 18
Hometown: Charleston, SC
Level: 7
“Just the incredible amount of progress you can see in yourself and in other people in only five weeks is really neat.  I would say probably one of the biggest challenges is being self critical and learning to work in a positive way… not being afraid of failing and focusing on the possibilities of what you can do, and really allowing yourself to learn what you can from teachers, because you can’t really learn anything if you’re afraid of failing.”

 

 

10 Summer Intensive TakeawaysEmma Jennings
Age: 16
Hometown: Takoma Park, MD
Level: 5
“The teachers care for the students’ futures, not just right in the present working on their technique.  When I get corrections from certain teachers or see others corrections given, it’s more ‘when you’re twenty you’re going to have to be able to do this in a company.’  It’s more future-oriented.”

 

 

 

10 Summer Intensive TakeawaysDaniel Cooke
Age: 24
Hometown: Silver Spring, MD
Level: Men 2B
“Coming to ISP made me realize that I’m capable of a lot more than I thought. I used to think, ‘Oh that role isn’t for me’ or, ‘That variation isn’t something that I feel comfortable doing.’ But, with working with, say Christopher (Budzynski) or Li Chou (Cheng), you get crossover with the company, and I figured out that I actually can achieve those variations, those roles, and bring them energy.”

 

 

10 Summer Intensive TakeawaysAmanda Lewis
Age: 15
Hometown: Akron, OH
Level: 4
“(The teachers) are all amazingly qualified and they care; you can really see. They give us corrections and they want us to improve.  All of the teachers are very particular about their details, especially in the port de bras which is really nice, because I like Balanchine a lot so sometimes I lose the classical flowiness of my arms.  They really pay attention to that, it’s something I can work on to have my positions where they need to be.”

 


10 Summer Intensive Takeaways

Maicon Oliveira
Age:19
Hometown: Curitiba, Brazil
Level: 2B
“The most surprising thing for me is how the American dancers helped me every day and how they talked to me. They were really friendly.”

 

 

 

10 Summer Intensive TakeawaysCamila Howard
Age: 14
Hometown: Virginia Beach, VA
Level: 2
“The most changing thing for me was coming into class every day and being around a group of kids where everyone is very serious and dedicated…I would say the biggest challenge is adapting to each teacher and remembering specific things they liked compared to other teachers.”

 

 

 


10 Summer Intensive TakeawaysIan Rafferty

Age: 23
Hometown: Austin, TX
Level: Men 2B
“Taking care of myself is probably a big one – my body and how I’m feeding myself especially.  It’s been interesting figuring out how to get through an 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. day.”

 

 

 


10 Summer Intensive TakeawaysMaggie Fosselius

Age: 14
Hometown: Denver, CO
Level: 3
“Just the experience. I think all the excursions are so fun. And the classes. I’ve never taken jazz or contemporary before; I just do strictly ballet, but they’re so fun and I think I want to do more of it now.  Introduction to that has been pretty awesome.”

 

 

 

10 Summer Intensive Takeaways

Andrew Fleischner
Age: 13
Hometown: Pittsburgh, PA
Level: Men 1
“Holding your position.  I make sure when the teacher gives me a correction that I try to do that as much as I can and remember to hold my arm in a special way…I had my first official pas de deux class here and it was fun, though kind of hard.”

 



10 Summer Intensive TakeawaysSantiago Pacheco

Age: 22
Hometown: Puebla, Mexico
Level: Men 2
“I’ve been here since the (school) year for the grad program.  But for the summer I think I’m getting in better shape, having all-day technique classes – every day.”

PBT School Grads to Compete in World Ballet Competition

Joining 225 elite dancers from more than 24 countries and 20 states, two Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre School Graduate Program students will compete in the final round of the 11th-annual World Ballet Competition (WBC) June 19-24, in Orlando, Florida. Pittsburgh dance fans can tune in to a live online broadcast of the competition by visiting worldballetcompetition.com and clicking “Watch Live.”

Japan natives Saki Tsuruta, who turns 20 on June 18, and Masanao Ito, 20, will perform the virtuosic grand pas de deux from the classical ballet Le Corsaire. This challenging showpiece takes the form of a dance for three in the full-length ballet, but is often staged as a duet for competition settings.

Tsuruta and Ito are full-time students in PBT School’s Graduate Program, a pre-professional training program for dancers who have graduated from high school and are preparing for professional ballet careers. More than half of PBT’s full-time company members trained in PBT School’s Pre-professional Division, and its alumni also have gone on to dance professionally with other U.S. and international companies. PBT Principal Dancer Yoshiaki Nakano, an alumni of the Graduate Program, took home a silver medal from the WBC in 2010.

Judged by major international dance masters and artistic directors, the WBC draws aspiring young dancers, of ages 9 to 24, from around the world to compete for more than $150,000 in cash, scholarship awards, job contracts and dance merchandise. All dancers were pre-selected through a rigorous video audition process and will be competing in the categories of Soloist, Pas de Deux,  Ensemble and Choreography. Prizes include the $10,000 Grand Prix award, which is open to all categories. Tsuruta and Ito will compete in the pre-professional Pas de Deux category.

The week-long event invites audience members for each day of the competition and is also broadcast live online worldwide (except for the gala performance). Each day’s livestream begins with a pre-show broadcast, which gives viewers interview and backstage access. The competition’s electronic scoring system also shares results with the audience in real time.

Since 2007, the WBC has drawn elite dancers representing more than 65 countries. Over the past ten events, competitors earned more than $1.5 million dollars in scholarship awards, cash prizes, job contracts, and dance merchandise, and 9 million video views have been generated online. Since its inauguration, the WBC has helped launch the professional careers of previous competitors now affiliated with prestigious ballet companies in five continents: North America, South America, Europe, Asia and Australia.

The event’s concluding Gala Performance on June 24, will feature winning competitors and internationally recognized professional dancers, including New York City Ballet Principal Dancer Daniel Ulbricht.

The WBC is presented by the Central Florida Ballet and funded in part by the Orange County Government through the Arts & Cultural Affairs Program, sponsored in part by the Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs, the Florida Council of Arts and Culture and the State of Florida, and supported by the United Arts of Central Florida.